Nomadic, Tender to Titanic, in 1:150, 1:160 and 1:220

Nomadic was one of two vessels commissioned by the White Star Line in 1910 to tender for their new ocean liners RMS Olympic and RMS Titanic, which were too large to dock in Cherbourg harbor. She and her running mate SS Traffic ferried passengers, their baggage, mail and ship’s supplies to and from large ocean liners moored offshore.

Note: the model was severely damaged when I dropped my camera on it before these images were taken. This model required five iterations to get dimensions and structural keys correct, so I’m not ready to build another.

This model of the SS Nomadic is specially built as a companion to Graupner’s 1:150 scale Titanic. It is available as a full hull or waterline model in the scale of 1:150. It is also available as a waterline model in 1:160 and 1:220. It is not designed as an operational model, as the below waterline hull component is cast resin; an enterprising modeler could convert this to a running model (although it would be perhaps too small for operation on a pond).


The full hull model is split at the waterline, with the below water portion cast in resin and the above water portion a standard bulkhead and skin styrene construction. I have no plans to model the lower hull in 1:160 or 1:220 at this time. If I receive a number of inquiries, I will consider making those components.

At 1:150 scale the model is 18.4” long (467 mm) by 2.96” wide (75 mm).
At 1:160 scale the model is 17.25” long (438 mm) by 2.78” wide (70.5 mm).
At 1:220 scale the model is 12.55” long (318 mm) by 2.02” wide (51.3 mm).

The ship may be ordered three ways: as (1) a kit, (2) a kit with the hull assembled, or (3) a fully completed model. A detail kit is recommended to complete the model. This detail kit contains all of the 18 gooseneck ventilators, four propellers and two anchors, and is purchased from Bluejacket Shipcrafters at retail. Customers may be able to find these components at a lower cost locally. A mounting board with two brass supports is supplied with the 1:150 full hull model when it is ordered as a completed model.

Prices are as follows in USD:

Kit Hull             Completed Kit                       Completed Model
1:150 Full                                 450                      675                                           1,500
1:150 Waterline                      395                       550                                          1,300
1:160 Waterline                      395                       550                                          1,300
1:220 Waterline                      395                       550                                          1,300

Detail kit for 1:150 and 1:160 models: about USD 170: prices will vary. 3D printed ventilators are just becoming available and may drop the price considerably. I have some ventilators suitable for 1:220, please inquire.

Prices do not include shipping and insurance.

Note to modelers: This full hull ship is for advanced modelers. The lower hull is a fairly rough casting that requires smoothing and fitting to the upper hull. This was a large casting that did not turn out as well as I hoped, but is eminently usable with smoothing work and filler. Also, the support structure for the top deck is keyed but requires careful attention to keep aligned.

Note: the prototype was severely damaged when crushed by my Nikon with heavy lens and flash, hence some supports and details are bent/displaced and some repairs are obvious. 

[Condensed from Wikipedia]
Nomadic was one of two vessels commissioned by the White Star Line in 1910 to tender for their new ocean liners RMS Olympic and RMS Titanic, which were too large to dock in Cherbourg harbor. She and her running mate SS Traffic ferried passengers, their baggage, mail and ship’s supplies to and from large ocean liners moored offshore.
The ship is 230 feet (70 m) long overall and 37 feet (11 m) wide, with a gross registered tonnage of 1,273 tons. Propulsion was provided by two single-ended coal-fired boilers and two compound steam engines, each driving two triple bladed propellers of 7 feet (2.1 m) in diameter, which gave a service speed of 12 knots (14 mph; 22 km/h).
Nomadic had four working decks with various hold spaces beneath. She could carry up to 1,000 passengers when fully loaded.
Passenger accommodation consisted of lower and upper deck passenger lounges and open deck areas on the bridge and flying bridge decks. The vessel was divided into first and second class passenger areas, with first class passengers enjoying the fore areas of the ship. A small area in the aft end of the lower deck was assigned for overspill of third-class passengers from SS Traffic.
Internally, Nomadic was fitted out to a similar standard as the liners Olympic and Titanic, which she was built to serve. As such, she had more luxuries than most tenders of her day, with cushioned benches, tables, porcelain water fountains, gender-specific bathrooms and a buffet bar. She contained ornate decorative joinery and plasterwork, particularly in the first class lounges of the ship.
Nomadic originally had two 20-foot (6.1 m) lifeboats, believed to have capacity for about 28 people each when fully loaded, to serve up to 1,200 passengers and crew in an emergency. They were later supplemented by life-rafts.